In The Gallery

The Schumacher Gallery at Westover School facilitates dialogue between students, professional artists, and the community through challenging and approachable contemporary exhibitions. The gallery provides a space where viewers can make meaningful connections between artwork, curriculum, and culture.
Through its five to six rotating exhibitions each year featuring professional and student artists in varying media, the gallery functions as a viewing and instructional space for an inquiring student body and the school's surrounding and varied communities.




Schumacher Gallery

Westover's Schumacher Gallery, located in the LBD Performing Arts Center, exhibits work throughout the year by professional artists, including photography, painting, ceramics and multimedia works.

Exhibits may be viewed from noon to 5 pm Monday through Friday and from 1 to 5 pm on Saturday when classes are in session.

Further information is available by contacting the gallery's Co-Directors Caleb Portfolio and Allison Hildebrand.

Visitors should access the Schumacher Gallery from the school's main entrance on the Middlebury Green and are asked to sign in with the school's receptionist.


Current Exhibition

"Working with your students for Diversity Day Workshops was not only enjoyable but also proved to be a powerful collaboration. In asking them to help me decide the placement of the various elements of my installation, they experienced the surprises that come when the artist edits his or her work in the gallery and I found that their input changed the way I looked at my own work. It was through that collaboration that the current layout of the installation exists."

Who: Susan McCaslin

When: March 19 through May 4

Exhibition Title: “Protection/Protected”

Artist Statement:

What began as an interest in a legend—a Connecticut itinerant from the nineteenth century—has evolved into a study of protection, both literal and emotional.
The path I am following, like that of the wanderer, has guided me towards a renewed interest in nature and to a new appreciation of the many forms of shelter devised by humans and non-humans alike.

This need for protection is inborn but as we travel our own paths, each of us develop particular strategies for keeping ourselves and others safe from harm. Whether it be the seemingly harmless barbs of sarcasm or the devastating harm of physical and sexual abuse; whether it be the distrust of a person or the distrust of the ground we stand on, we seek protection for ourselves and others. Caves, burrows, houses, cars, clothing, isolation, popularity, depression, behaviour—these are just a few of the layerings we create.

This installation, Wall/Paper II, covers three gallery walls with 2600 strips of newspaper, each attached to the wall with one clothespin. The six inch by twenty-two inch strips have been soaked in a bath of Sumi Ink and water and hung to dry on a clothesline in my studio. It took twenty-six sessions of dying these sheets of paper, one hundred at a time. As I touched each one, I listened to podcasts about, kindness, slowing down, memory, confidence, art theory, organization techniques and more. And when I switched to music, I would remember old times like hanging laundry in the winter with my grandmother, putting my hand in the bag of ice-cold clothespins, feeling them and hearing them click against each other. And I remember the weight of the sheets as we hung them over the line, smoothing them with our hands, the same way I smoothed these strips in preparation for this exhibit. For me, Wall/Paper II not only contains information from the printed page, it also absorbed the information that I heard, and my memories that came to light, as I bathed, dyed, and hung the strips to dry.

Upcoming Exhibition

Coming Soon

Media



Past Exhibitions

Shanna Merola: Jan-March 1st


Who: Shanna Merola

When: January through March 1st

Exhibition Title: “We All Live Downwind”

About the Artist:

Shanna Merola is a visual artist, photojournalist and activist legal worker. In addition to her studio practice, she has been a human rights observer during political uprisings across the country - from the deeply embattled struggle for water rights in Detroit and Flint, Michigan, to the frontlines of Ferguson, MO and Standing Rock, ND. Her collages and constructed landscapes are informed by these events. Merola lives in Detroit, MI where she facilitates Know-Your-Rights workshops on best practices during police encounters, and coordinates legal support for grassroots organizations through the Michigan Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild.

Merola has been a lecturer and visiting artist at the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities, Cranbrook Academy of Art, the University of Richmond Department of Art and Art History, and the School of Visual and Performing Arts at the University of Toledo. Her work has been published by the Humble Arts Foundation, Art 21 Magazine, Wayne State University Press and Nat.Brut. Her artwork has been exhibited both nationally and abroad. She has been awarded studio residencies at The MacDowell Colony and the Santa Fe Art Institute, and fellowships through the Virginia Museum of Fine Art and the Midwest Environmental Justice Network. Merola holds an MFA in Photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art and a BFA in Photo and Film from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Artist Statement:

The images in We All Live Downwind are culled from daily headlines – inspired by both global and grassroots struggles against the forces of privatization in the face of disaster capitalism. In The Shock Doctrine, Naomi Klein writes about the free market driven exploitation of disaster-shocked people and countries. Saying “the original disaster—the coup, the terrorist attack, the market meltdown, the war, the tsunami, the hurricane — puts the entire population into a state of collective shock”. And that “shocked societies often give up things they would otherwise fiercely protect”. The scenes in We All Live Downwind, have been carved out of dystopian landscapes in the aftermath of that shock.

On the surface, rubble hints at layers of oil and shale, cracked and bubbling from the earth below. Rising from another mound, rows of empty mobile homes bake beneath the summer sun. The bust of small towns left dry in the aftermath of supply and demand. In this place, only fragments of people remain, their mechanical gestures left tending to the chaos on auto. Reduced to survival, their struggle against an increasingly hostile environment goes unnoticed. Beyond the upheaval of production a bending highway promises never ending expansion - and that low rumble you hear to the west is getting louder.

Shaunda Holloway: Aug. 28th-Nov. 5th

Current Exhibition

Current Exhibition

Who: Susan McCaslin

When: March 19th-May 4th

Title: Protection/Protected

Artist Statement:

What began as an interest in a legend—a Connecticut itinerant from the nineteenth century—has evolved into a study of protection, both literal and emotional.

The path I am following, like that of the wanderer, has guided me towards a renewed interest in nature and to a new appreciation of the many forms of shelter devised by humans and non-humans alike.

This need for protection is inborn but as we travel our own paths, each of us develop particular strategies for keeping ourselves and others safe from harm.Whether it be the seemingly harmless barbs of sarcasm or the devastating harm of physical and sexual abuse; whether it be the distrust of a person or the distrust of the ground we stand on, we seek protection for ourselves and others. Caves, burrows, houses, cars, clothing, isolation, popularity, depression, behaviour—these are just a few of the layerings we create.

This installation, Wall/Paper II, covers three gallery walls with 2600 strips of newspaper, each attached to the wall with one clothespin. The six inch by twenty-two inch strips have been soaked in a bath of Sumi Ink and water and hung to dry on a clothesline in my studio. It took twenty-six sessions of dying these sheets of paper, one hundred at a time. As I touched each one, I listened to podcasts about, kindness, slowing down, memory, confidence, art theory, organization techniques and more. And when I switched to music, I would remember old times like hanging laundry in the winter with my grandmother, putting my hand in the bag of ice-cold clothespins, feeling them and hearing them click against each other. And I remember the weight of the sheets as we hung them over the line, smoothing them with our hands, the same way I smoothed these strips in preparation for this exhibit. For me, Wall/Paper II not only contains information from the printed page, it also absorbedthe information that I heard, and my memories that came to light, as I bathed, dyed, and hung the strips to dry.

Who: Shaunda Holloway

When: August 28th-November 5th.

Exhibition Title: Emerging

About the Artist:

Shaunda Holloway (Sekai) is painter/printmaker and writer born in New Haven, CT.Her writing has been published in ESSENCE magazine, CT Post, Inner City, Stand Our Ground Poems for Trayvon Martin and Marissa Alexander and other publications.Her paintings and prints have been exhibited throughout the east coast, including New Delhi, India.

Artist Statement:

This exhibition acknowledges the power of our choices. The choice to emerge in the midst of rubble, to burst like light into dark corners belongs to each of us. It is actually the answer to all that seeks to keep us separated, hostile and filled with hate. I choose to emerge. It is really all I know. Sure there have been obstacles. But, without obstacles how can we taste the nectar of victory.

Jacqueline Siefert: May 12-June 2, 2017

Who: Jacqueline Siefert '07

When: May 12th-June 2nd

About the Artist:

I’ve never been able to stick to one medium: I create constantly and as soon as I feel very locked in to one theme or method, I have to try something new. I continually work in circles.
I attended Westover School (2007) and Rhode Island School of Design (2012), where I completed a year of Furniture Design before switching to Apparel Design. I also studied abroad in Rome, Italy where I painted and made sculptures and got lost in the city. I love combining materials, methods and technical ability to make my work, and let it evolve and grow.
I currently work as a textile designer, painter, writer and occasional seamstress/patternmaker.
I like beauty and color and am continually amazed by naturally occurring color and texture combinations.Most of all, I love listening to the muse when she hands me something beautiful and am always waiting for that unexplained spark that leads me down a path.

Artist Statement:

“My Ladies”

I’ve been obsessively drawing these beautiful, yet disenchanted ladies for years, and they have evolved as my own eye has shifted.Sometimes I focus only on their surroundings, or their place within the piece (or group of pieces); sometimes the environment overpowers them, and sometimes they navigate it.
Sometimes their clothes take over, and sometimes the viewer stands in the place of the lady and observes her surroundings. In the beginnings of this theme, my ladies were on plain wooden backgrounds but they have grown to occupy their own spaces.
Recently, they’ve begun to shift their gaze away from the viewer. Through close observation of the people around me, a sensitivity to and appreciation of my environment, a love of material and color experimentation, and my own evolving sense of self, I’ve created an alternate community of ladies and a world within which they can exist.

Colin Burke: March 27-May 5, 2017

Who: Colin Burke

When: March 27-May 5th

Artist Statement:

I choose to work with antique photographic processes, large format cyanotype photograms and months-long exposures made with hand built pinhole cameras, to explore the elasticity of time, plasticity of memory, and the consistent rhythm of nature. The work is meant to remind us that the power of the sun, the cycle of the seasons and the earth's rotation were happening well before humans existed and will likely continue long after we're gone.

Meg Bloom: January 4-March 3, 2017

Who: Meg Bloom

When: Jan. 4-March 3

Artist Statement:

Finding beauty in the imperfect or impermanent, acknowledging moments of change and engaging with the process of transformation (often) form the basis of my work. My process is guided by the mix of planning and chance that the materials I use offer to the imagery.

My art often references nature, (including human nature,) whether evoking the

skeletons or remains of what was or the discovery of new life (growth) stealing its way amidst the ashes. It reflects memories, traces, and fantasies that combine metaphors for what has been and will be.

I may start with pulp to produce large handmade paper sculptures, or raw fibers which I cook and peel, then reassemble, or layers of silk and wax and papers which I transform through the use of heat. Regardless of the end product, my process involves a breaking down and reassembling or revisioning of both the materials and my own visual memories.

Read more here

Westover Art Department Faculty Exhibition: November 30-December 16, 2016

Who: Westover Art Department Faculty Exhibition

When: Nov. 30-Dec. 16th

What: The Westover Art Department Faculty Exhibition features the personal pursuits of our performing and visual arts faculty. From subjects ranging from the sovereign farmer to bundled landscapes, from pets to performance art, our faculty demonstrate a diversity of interests and insights. Read more here about the show.

Barbara Hocker: September 30-November 14, 2016

Who: Barbara Hocker, "Waterside Reveries"

When: September 30th to November 14th

What: "Waterside Reveries," an installation art exhibition created by mixed media artist Barbara Hocker, will be on display in Westover's Schumacher Gallery from Friday, September 30, through Monday, November 14.
An artist's reception open to the public was held Friday, October 14, from 5 to 6:30 pm. Read more here about the exhibition.


Westover Events

News