The Arts, both visual and performing, are essential to life, learning and creative problem solving. The Art Department at Westover provides an immersive and varied program that facilitates an interchange of ideas that encourages students to become more aware of the world around them. Through collaborative and independent learning processes and the mastery of thoroughly taught skills, students learn to see clearly, listen acutely, think critically, and to explore creatively so that they can move and express themselves with confidence.


The Arts, both visual and performing, are essential to life and to learning. Art courses encourage a student to become more aware of the world around her, to appreciate beauty, and to make use of thoroughly taught skills to express herself with confidence.

Two credits in the Arts are required for graduation. Freshmen and new sophomores are required to take Introduction to Visual Art, and those planning to take Advanced Studio courses should take Elements of Art.

View the entire Curriculum Guide

Department Chairs

Bob Havery, Performing
Juilliard School, B.M., M.S.

Sara Poskas, Visual

Oberlin College, BA
University of Illinois, MA
Teaching Certification

In the Arts Events

Who: Shanna Merola

When: January through March 1st

Exhibition Title: “We All Live Downwind”

About the Artist:

Shanna Merola is a visual artist, photojournalist and activist legal worker. In addition to her studio practice, she has been a human rights observer during political uprisings across the country - from the deeply embattled struggle for water rights in Detroit and Flint, Michigan, to the frontlines of Ferguson, MO and Standing Rock, ND. Her collages and constructed landscapes are informed by these events. Merola lives in Detroit, MI where she facilitates Know-Your-Rights workshops on best practices during police encounters, and coordinates legal support for grassroots organizations through the Michigan Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild.

Merola has been a lecturer and visiting artist at the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities, Cranbrook Academy of Art, the University of Richmond Department of Art and Art History, and the School of Visual and Performing Arts at the University of Toledo. Her work has been published by the Humble Arts Foundation, Art 21 Magazine, Wayne State University Press and Nat.Brut. Her artwork has been exhibited both nationally and abroad. She has been awarded studio residencies at The MacDowell Colony and the Santa Fe Art Institute, and fellowships through the Virginia Museum of Fine Art and the Midwest Environmental Justice Network. Merola holds an MFA in Photography from Cranbrook Academy of Art and a BFA in Photo and Film from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Artist Statement:

The images in We All Live Downwind are culled from daily headlines – inspired by both global and grassroots struggles against the forces of privatization in the face of disaster capitalism. In The Shock Doctrine, Naomi Klein writes about the free market driven exploitation of disaster-shocked people and countries. Saying “the original disaster—the coup, the terrorist attack, the market meltdown, the war, the tsunami, the hurricane — puts the entire population into a state of collective shock”. And that “shocked societies often give up things they would otherwise fiercely protect”. The scenes in We All Live Downwind, have been carved out of dystopian landscapes in the aftermath of that shock.

On the surface, rubble hints at layers of oil and shale, cracked and bubbling from the earth below. Rising from another mound, rows of empty mobile homes bake beneath the summer sun. The bust of small towns left dry in the aftermath of supply and demand. In this place, only fragments of people remain, their mechanical gestures left tending to the chaos on auto. Reduced to survival, their struggle against an increasingly hostile environment goes unnoticed. Beyond the upheaval of production a bending highway promises never ending expansion - and that low rumble you hear to the west is getting louder.

LBD Performing Arts Center

LBD Performing Arts Center

In Novemeber of 1961, ground was broken for the construction of the Louise Bulkley Dillingham Student Activities Building (LBD).
In 1962, the building was officially dedicated in honor of Westover's second headmistress.
In 1963, Coagess noted that the LBD was "a building which increased opportunity, while preserving Westover's essential spirit." The original structure was designed to house both the School's athletic facilities and its performing arts space.

Westover's Schumacher Gallery, located in the LBD Performing Arts Center, exhibits work throughout the year by professional artists, including photography, painting, ceramics and multimedia works.

More information can be found on the In The Gallery Page.

Westover Events

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